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May we suggest

Lindsay Nixon

Lindsay Nixon is a Cree-Métis-Saulteaux curator, an award-nominated editor and writer, and a McGill art history Ph.D. student. They currently hold the position of editor-at-large for Canadian Art.
A Conversation with Brenda Draney
What Do We Mean by Queer Indigenous Ethics?

What Do We Mean by Queer Indigenous Ethics?

Billy-Ray Belcourt and Lindsay Nixon discuss the ways in which queer and trans Indigenous folks enact another kind of art and theory.

Maybe There’ll Be a Better Tomorrow: A Conversation with Shelley Niro

Maybe There’ll Be a Better Tomorrow: A Conversation with Shelley Niro

As her career retrospective debuts in Toronto, Shelley Niro sits down to talk about Indigenous femininities, picking berries, and the sometimes-tricky ratio between darkroom work and family time

Art in 2017: A View from Turtle Island

Art in 2017: A View from Turtle Island

Strong exhibitions in Winnipeg, Kitchener-Waterloo and Toronto highlight an Indigenous critic’s year-end bests.

We Lost an Entire Generation

We Lost an Entire Generation

Indigenous peoples remain ghettoized within, and largely absent from, what is often considered to be AIDS art.

Nation to Nation

Nation to Nation

Remembering “Native Love,” an exhibition that confronted the warrior rhetoric surrounding the Oka Crisis through concepts of love, sensuality and care.

Rebecca Belmore Wants Us to Listen to the Land

Rebecca Belmore Wants Us to Listen to the Land

Twenty-six years ago, artist Rebecca Belmore prompted Canadians to speak to the land. Now, her newest artwork urges us to listen to it.

This Work Is Not for You

This Work Is Not for You

“This issue is a love letter to all my fierce and fabulous relations—my NDN baby girls, women or otherwise—who ground their work in kinship teachings.”

Making Space in Indigenous Art for Bull Dykes and Gender Weirdos

Making Space in Indigenous Art for Bull Dykes and Gender Weirdos

It’s about time for the Indigenous art canon to create a space for gender-variant and sexually diverse voices. They’ve been mostly excluded for decades.