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Reviews

Felix Schramm in San Francisco

Felix Schramm in San Francisco

San Francisco is an iconic city, a place of legend, the favoured setting of many a mid-century American murder mystery, and, like all compelling places, a site crammed with contradictions.

Ron Giii in Scarborough

Ron Giii in Scarborough

“Hegel’s Salt Man” may or may not be a skeletal little man who resembles a salt shaker with pointy arms and legs.

Paul P.

Paul P.

Paul P.’s recent work lulls viewers into pleasantly melancholic reveries. P. is part of a cadre of young Canadian artists (which also includes Scott Treleaven and Luis Jacob) who are currently breaking onto the international art scene, and whose art practices seem directly informed by their sexual orientation.

Francisco Castro

Francisco Castro

For his second exhibition at Diaz Contemporary, the Mexico City–based artist Francisco Castro once again offered paintings based on the grid, which for a century has been a primary means of modernist visual organization.

Projections

Projections

In the wake of two recent survey exhibitions devoted to the medium of projection, the following words by Victor Burgin, used by Ian Carr-Harris in his 1995 projection piece Rozenstraat 8, seem especially apt: “History has moved around my own work, changing at least one of its meanings…Today such work constitutes a distinct genre, and an item in the available repertoire of stylistic conventions.”

Karin Bubaš

Karin Bubaš

Karin Bubaš’s most recent solo exhibition features a new photographic series by the Vancouver artist: Studies in Landscape and Wardrobe extends her pursuit of the compositional integration of human form and psychology. The images depict stylishly dressed women in park settings.

Jamelie Hassan

Jamelie Hassan

Grassroots movements, world-renowned writers, scholars and artists have joined hands in opposing the war in Iraq, pointing to the benefits of dialogue and the dangers of monologue. The war itself has revived discussion of Samuel P. Huntington’s morbid theory that civilizations are inherently different and therefore doomed to clash.

Skulptur Projekte Münster 07

Skulptur Projekte Münster 07

In 1977, the exhibition “Skulptur,” curated by Klaus Bussmann and Kasper König, opened in Münster amid public debate about the role of art in urban space. Thus began Skulptur Projekte Münster, a once-per-decade city-wide event that König calls “a long-term study” of art and its relationship to the public sphere.

MakeBelieve

MakeBelieve

In their exhibition “MakeBelieve,” the curators Catherine Crowston and Barbara Fischer presented 10 artists “for whom representation is like a magic trick.” Operating on the premise that reality in art is a fictive construct—an imagining of the mind—the exhibition recalibrated the concept of the suspension of disbelief.

Steven Shearer

Steven Shearer

Steven Shearer’s exhibition gives an audience insight into a private world realized and documented through the obsessive collecting of images. Shearer’s collecting focuses on music, heavy metal in particular—a preference that resonates in the city of Birmingham, birthplace of Black Sabbath and Judas Priest.

From the Archive

Divya Mehra Undoes White on White

Divya Mehra Undoes White on White

“You have to tell Them, I’m not a Racist.” desecrates the white cube with gleeful impunity.

Trouble Me Venice: An Indigenous Curator’s View of the Biennale

Trouble Me Venice: An Indigenous Curator’s View of the Biennale

Ryan Rice was part of an international delegation of Indigenous curators at Venice's preview week. Here are some of the triumphs and troubles he saw.

Rosalyn Drexler: Who Does She Think She Is?

Rosalyn Drexler: Who Does She Think She Is?

Rosalyn Drexler, the proto-feminist painter, sculptor, playwright, novelist and former lady wrester, is criminally unknown. A new show aims to change this.