One of the Most Generous Fellowships Available to Emerging Canadian Visual Artists – Canadian Art
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Sponsored / November 18, 2020

One of the Most Generous Fellowships Available to Emerging Canadian Visual Artists

Claudine and Stephen Bronfman Fellowship in Contemporary Art is a postgraduate professionalization platform unlike any other
Mara Eagle, <em>Théâtre de l'Inconnu</em> (still), 2018–20. 2-channel HD video and sound, 13 min. / Mara Eagle, image fixe de <em>Théâtre de l'Inconnu</em>, 2018–20. 2-canal HD vidéo et son, 13 min. Mara Eagle, Théâtre de l'Inconnu (still), 2018–20. 2-channel HD video and sound, 13 min. / Mara Eagle, image fixe de Théâtre de l'Inconnu, 2018–20. 2-canal HD vidéo et son, 13 min.

Version française.

Each year, the Claudine and Stephen Bronfman Fellowship in Contemporary Art is awarded to two emerging artists in Montreal—one from Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) and one from Concordia University.

Valued at more than $60,000 over a two-year period, the recognition and support provided individually by this highly competitive fellowship creates an opportunity for these artists to develop their work and research at a crucial point in their careers: when they leave the academic world and move into the contemporary art world.

Fellowships are awarded to recent graduates from MFA or PhD programs in the visual or media arts, whose body of work is focused on the following disciplines: ceramics, design, drawing, fibre, digital media, painting, photography, print media, sculpture or installation.

During their eleven-year old partnership with the Claudine and Stephen Bronfman Family Foundation, Concordia and UQAM—the two largest and most influential institutions for fine arts education in Quebec—have created a postgraduate professionalization platform unlike any other in Canada.

For two years, fellows have time to refine their work, expand their professional networks and develop a research-creation profile. They have access to university facilities, gain teaching experience, are mentors to students and present an end-of-term solo show in Montreal. They may spend funds at their discretion—on studio costs, production materials, research travel or the dissemination of their work.

As one of the most generous fellowships available to emerging Canadian visual artists, these fellowships contribute to the growth of arts and culture in Canada and reinforces Montreal’s position as a city of culture on the international stage.

Heidi Barkun, Installation view of Heidi Barkun, Installation view of "LET’S GET YOU PREGNANT!," at Galerie de l’UQAM, February 7 to March 21, 2020. / Heidi Barkun, vue partielle d’exposition "LET’S GET YOU PREGNANT!," Galerie de l’UQAM, 7 février au 21 mars 2020.

Mara Eagle and Heidi Barkun are the 2020 winners of the Claudine and Stephen Bronfman Fellowship in Contemporary Art.

“In this time of great global uncertainty, I would like to express my gratitude for the artistic recognition and the financial stability this fellowship provides,” said laureate Heidi Barkun.

“I had an amazing experience doing my MFA at Concordia, but it went by too quickly. In a sense, this program is helping me press the reset button,” says Mara Eagle.

Coinciding with the announcement of the 2020 fellows, a new bilingual website was launched that provides more information about the fellowship and presents recent work by all twenty-two artists who have won these coveted fellowships since 2010.

Previous Laureates

2019: Céline Huyguebaert (UQAM) and Madeleine Mayo (Concordia)
2018: Frédérique Laliberté (Concordia) and Émilie Serri (UQAM)
2017: Andréanne Abbondanza (Concordia) and Martin Leduc (UQAM)
2016: Yannick Desranleau (Concordia) and Guillaume Adjutor Provost (UQAM)
2015: Velibor Božović (Concordia) and Myriam Jacob-Allard (UQAM)
2014: Marie Dauverné (UQAM) and Brendan Flanagan (Concordia)
2013: Nadia Seboussi (UQAM) and Kim Waldron (Concordia)
2012: Sébastien Cliche (UQAM) and Julie Favreau (Concordia)
2011: Aude Moreau (UQAM) and Pavitra Wickramasinghe (Concordia)
2010: Steven Bates (Concordia) and Véronique Savard (UQAM)