Skip to content

May we suggest

News / September 20, 2018

News in Brief: Support Builds for Censored Artwork

An artwork on trans visibility recently removed from Arts Commons has found new venues in Edmonton, Calgary and Windsor. Plus: the Sobey Art Award announces a new set of residencies for select artists
On September 12, Arts Commons told the New Gallery that this printed poster listing names of murdered trans people also had to be removed from the vitrine, along with the switched-off video monitors. On September 12, Arts Commons told the New Gallery that this printed poster listing names of murdered trans people also had to be removed from the vitrine, along with the switched-off video monitors.
On September 12, Arts Commons told the New Gallery that this printed poster listing names of murdered trans people also had to be removed from the vitrine, along with the switched-off video monitors. On September 12, Arts Commons told the New Gallery that this printed poster listing names of murdered trans people also had to be removed from the vitrine, along with the switched-off video monitors.

Support is growing for a censored artwork on trans visibility. As reported by Canadian Art last week, Beck Gilmer-Osborne‘s piece A Thousand Cuts has been removed from Arts Commons in Calgary against the objections of the New Gallery, the artist-run centre that programmed it there. But now, A Thousand Cuts is being presented in three new venues: the University of Calgary Art Department, Latitude 53 in Edmonton and Left Contemporary in Windsor. Other venues in other cities may be participating in future. A number of Calgary art centres have also cancelled a reception they were going to hold this week in the same Arts Commons thoroughfare where A Thousand Cuts was removed. The New Gallery will also be holding an open forum on A Thousand Cuts and related issues on September 25 in Calgary. (emailed press release)

The Sobey Art Award is expanding to include international residencies. The residencies for select Sobey-longlisted artists will be Delfina Foundation in London, the International Studio and Curatorial Program in Brooklyn and the Künstlerhaus Bethanien in Berlin. Initial winners of the residencies are Lou Sheppard for the ISCP, Life of a Craphead at the Delfina and Krista Belle Stewart at the Künstlerhaus Bethanien. The next recipients will be announced summer 2019. (press release)

There’s a new tool kit available for arts accessibility in Canada. The tool kit, developed by the School of Media Studies and Information Technology at Humber College and Tangled Art + Disability, and in collaboration with disability-identified, Mad and Deaf Humber students and artists is a downloadable PDF resource “of developing practices that informs and educates artists, arts organizations, curators, students, staff and faculty on ways to incorporate accessibility into the presentation of art and design. The project provides practical guidelines around inclusion and access in art galleries and spaces.” (Creative Users Projects)

Michelle Schultz is the new interim director at Latitude 53. The interim period will begin on October 1 and run for one year. She studied art, design and visual culture at the University of Alberta before moving to London to complete her MA in contemporary art from the Sotheby’s Institute of Art. Most recently she was the director of dc3 Art Projects and Bookshop in Edmonton. (Latitude 53)

Nadia Myre’s work from the Glasgow International will be showing soon in Berlin. Myre’s “Code Switching and Other Work,” an exhibition first presented by Mother Tongue during Glasgow International 2018, will show at Art Mûr Berlin from September 28 to November 10. (Art Mûr)

Douglas Coupland has created a public artwork for Expo Chicago. His billboard piece reads, IT’S NOT AN ILLUSION. TIME IS MOVING MORE QUICKLY. The wider billboard program will feature works by Sam Durant, Judy Chicago, Theaster Gates and Portia Munson, among others, and will be on view on billboards throughout the city of Chicago until October 7. Coupland’s Toronto dealer, Daniel Faria Projects, will also be at the Expo Chicago fair showing works by Coupland and Kristine Moran. (Daniel Faria Gallery)

Jon Rafman is having his first major Italian solo show. “The Mental Traveller” opened September 14 and runs to February 24 at Palazzina dei Giardini in Modena, presented by Fondazione Modena Arti Visive. It is billed as “the first large-scale exhibition of works by Jon Rafman to be shown in an Italian contemporary art institution.” (e-flux)

Unique Multiples will present Canadian artist Charles Stankievech at Artissima. The Italian art fair’s 25th anniversary edition will be November 2 to 4 in Piedmont. For their 25th anniversary, Artissima will include a new curated sound section, devoted entirely to monographic works focused on the investigation of sound in contemporary art. This is the part of the fair Unique Multiples is presenting Stankievech in. Unique Multiples uses blockchain technology to authenticate artist editions. (Unique Multiples)

A Canadian art advisor has been denied entry to the US. “For years, Toronto art dealer Talin Maltepe has criss-crossed the U.S.-Canada border for business,” the CBC reports. “Last week, she was denied entry. After being questioned, fingerprinted and photographed by U.S. immigration officials at Toronto Pearson International Airport, Maltepe was finally escorted out of the terminal.” A lawyer consulted by the CBC says the customs officers were in their rights, as Maltepe’s admission that she might work for pay in the US would require a visa. But the lawyer also stated such checks are on the rise under Trump’s administration. (CBC)

Mélanie Joly says she is learning from her missteps as Heritage Minister. “Sitting down for an interview in Montreal’s fashion district, in the heart of her riding, Ms. Joly continues to project the confidence that characterized her stint at Heritage, but also a newfound humility,” the Globe reports. “She boasts about her accomplishments at Heritage, but also admits to ‘rookie mistakes’ that marked her tenure.” (Globe and Mail)

In case you missed it. MOCA Toronto is opening this weekend, and Amanda Boulos won the RBC Canadian Painting Competition. (Canadian Art)

Leah Sandals

Leah Sandals is a writer and editor of white settler Canadian (Irish and Ashkenazi) descent. She is also news and special sections editor at Canadian Art and has written for the Toronto Star, National Post and Globe and Mail, among other publications. Sandals welcomes tips, corrections and comments anytime at leah@canadianart.ca.