Canadian Art

Slideshow

Joyce Wieland: True Patriot Love

An Online Supplement to the Fall 2011 issue of Canadian Art
Installation view of Joyce Wieland’s “True Patriot Love” exhibition at the National Gallery of Canada, July 2 to August 8, 1971 / photo © National Gallery of Canada Installation view of Joyce Wieland’s “True Patriot Love” exhibition at the National Gallery of Canada, July 2 to August 8, 1971 / photo © National Gallery of Canada

Installation view of Joyce Wieland’s “True Patriot Love” exhibition at the National Gallery of Canada, July 2 to August 8, 1971 / photo © National Gallery of Canada

To mark the 40th anniversary of Joyce Wieland’s landmark 1971 exhibition “True Patriot Love” at the National Gallery of Canada, writer Sara Angel, in our Fall 2011 issue, takes a look at the hot topics of the era and the lasting impact of the country’s first major museum retrospective of a living female artist. Blending environmentalism, nationalism, feminism and Wieland’s highly idiosyncratic aesthetics, “True Patriot Love,” Angel writes, “altered the course of Canadian art.” Included here are additional photos from the groundbreaking exhibition, documenting the moment that Wieland emerged as a national figure with “a startlingly original voice to express a timely idea of national identity.”

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This article was first published online on September 8, 2011.

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