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Toronto International Design Festival: The Art of Living

Various Venues, Toronto Jan 24 to 30 2011
Becky Lane and Chrissy Poitras will revamp clocks as part of their process-based installation <i>Chaos Theory</i> at the Gladstone Hotel during the Toronto International Design Festival Becky Lane and Chrissy Poitras will revamp clocks as part of their process-based installation Chaos Theory at the Gladstone Hotel during the Toronto International Design Festival

Becky Lane and Chrissy Poitras will revamp clocks as part of their process-based installation <i>Chaos Theory</i> at the Gladstone Hotel during the Toronto International Design Festival

The 2011 Toronto International Design Festival officially kicked off downtown this past Monday, but some of the week’s most exciting events are yet to come in the form of west-end exhibition projects that celebrate creative community and local talent. The Gladstone’s eighth annual Come Up to My Room opens on Friday, with 11 of the hotel’s rooms surrendered to artists and designers. The redecorated and reimagined rooms are almost always high-impact and inspired, so it’s no wonder that this has become a TIDF favourite. This year’s outing is curated by Jeremy Vandermeij and Deborah Wang and features Derek Liddington, Pamila Matharu and Scott Eunson, among other contemporary artists. Starting today, you can check out the inaugural Do West Design event happening in storefronts along Dundas West between Bathurst and Grace. Supported by the Trinity Bellwoods BIA and organized by Marie Collier, Do West Design promises to be sprawling show of craftsmanship. Dundas West is apparently the unofficial hub of off-site design festival events this year, as the exhibition “MADE at Home” also opens today in an apartment above the well-regarded furniture boutique MADE at 867 Dundas Street West. This living space, which has been transformed by exciting new work from 33 up-and-coming Canadian designers, remains open to the public until February 12. Across the street at Bookhou is “Capacity,” a thematic showcase of 10 local, female designers on to February 6. These are just a few of the 20-plus events on the TIDF roster that go beyond the trade draw of this weekend’s Interior Design Show—and whether one hits all or just a few, there’s little doubt that one will leave meditating on the art of living.

This article was first published online on January 27, 2011.

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