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Warhol Live: In the Artist’s Studio 54

Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal Sep 25 2008 to Jan 18 2009
Andy Warhol holding a 1964 publicity photograph of the Rolling Stones;  Courtesy of the Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh Andy Warhol holding a 1964 publicity photograph of the Rolling Stones; Courtesy of the Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh

Andy Warhol holding a 1964 publicity photograph of the Rolling Stones; Courtesy of the Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh

It has been rock and roll season in Montreal with “Sympathy for the Devil” at the Museé d’art contemporain and “Warhol Live” at the Musée des beaux-arts. Curated by Stéphane Aquin of the MBAM together with curators from the Centre Pompidou in Paris and the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, “Warhol Live” looks at the artist’s sustained connection with the worlds of music and dance.

Warhol’s Studio 54 discotheque days in 1970s Manhattan are infamous, and they are well represented in the exhibit by works featuring portraits of Liza Minnelli, Grace Jones, Mick Jagger and Debbie Harry. With more than 600 works in the exhibition, it is a comprehensive show that includes paintings, silkscreens, photographs, works on paper, installations, films and videos. A highlight is the first-time presentation of a survey of Warhol-designed album covers—beginning with jazz and classical music covers from the 1950s—assembled by Montreal collector Paul Maréchal. (1380 rue Sherbrooke O, Montreal QC)

This article was first published online on November 20, 2008.

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