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Massimo Guerrera: Quiet in the Forest

Darling Foundry, Montreal Jun 26 to Aug 31 2008
Massimo Guerrera  <i>A Hyphen between the Visible and the Invisible (Darboral)</i>  2008  Installation view photo Guy L'Heureux Massimo Guerrera A Hyphen between the Visible and the Invisible (Darboral) 2008 Installation view photo Guy L'Heureux

Massimo Guerrera <i>A Hyphen between the Visible and the Invisible (Darboral)</i> 2008 Installation view photo Guy L'Heureux

Montreal artist Massimo Guerrera has long incorporated performance and ritual into his art, and his summer installation at the Darling Foundry is no exception. In the work A Hyphen between the Visible and the Invisible (Darboral), Guerrera invites visitors to take part in creativity workshops, body castings and shared meals. These are strategies of engagement meant to focus attention on psychic and physical modes of meditation. They also are the basis for the creation of trace sculptural elements that Guerrera incorporates into the work. A layout of trestle tables, plants and carpets fleshes out an eccentric setting that fosters an appreciation of quiet, delicate growth inside the vast brick and concrete space of the gallery. Other indoor and outdoor exhibitions on site at the same time feature artists Jessica Warboys, Jocelyne Alloucherie and Jean-Paul Ganem. (745 rue Ottawa, Montreal QC)

This article was first published online on July 17, 2008.

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