CURRENT ISSUE | FALL 2017: THE IDEA OF HISTORY
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Must-Sees

Mark Leckey Performs, and More Prize-Worthy Weekly Picks

A performance by a Turner Prize–winning artist, a North American first for Ireland’s most recent Venice Biennale alum and a survey of contemporary Jamaican art provide some of the coast-to-coast art highlights for the next seven days, July 12 to 18.

July 12, 6 p.m.: Opening for “Contemporary Jamaican Art” at the Art Gallery of Mississauga, 300 City Centre Drive, Mississauga
Curated by Dr. Veerle Poupeye, executive director at the National Gallery of Jamaica, this exhibition of 22 Jamaican and four Canadian-Jamaican artists (including Michael Chambers and Dionne Simpson) celebrates the 50th anniversary of Jamaican independence.

July 13, 6 p.m.: Artist talks and openings for Mark Clintberg and Catherine Burgess at the Art Gallery of Alberta, 2 Sir Winston Churchill Square, Edmonton
Montreal-based critic, curator and artist Clintberg, who grew up in a small town outside of Edmonton, opens a large-scale installation in the AGA foyer, while Burgess debuts witty, minimal sculptures in the institution’s RBC New Works Gallery.

July 13, 7:30 p.m.: Performance by Mark Leckey at the Walter Phillips Gallery, 107 Tunnel Mountain Drive, Banff
The Turner Prize–winning UK artist Mark Leckey enacts a one-time-only performance—likely to be noisy and surreal—related to his exhibition at the Walter Phillips Gallery, “BigBoxGreenScreenRefrigeratorActions.”

July 14, 2 p.m.: Artist talk by Sarah Browne, Contemporary Art Gallery, 555 Nelson Street, Vancouver
With the CAG hosting Browne’s first North American solo show, the Irish artist, who co-represented her nation at the 2009 Venice Biennale, talks about works that include a radio made out of pyrite (fool’s gold).

July 18, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.: Artist talk and opening for Michael Snow at the AGO, 317 Dundas Street West, Toronto
One of Canada’s most revered contemporary artists, and now into his eighth decade, Michael Snow is commemorated (along with his 2011 Gershon Iskowitz Prize win) at the AGO with a selection of abstract sculpture made from the 1950s to the 1980s.

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