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Must-Sees

Must-Sees This Week: May 7 to 13, 2015

Lots of great art exhibitions open across the country this week. Here are our recommendations. (And remember to visit our Exhibition Finder for worthwhile shows that are already open.)

Peterborough

In “Sisters,” Dayna Danger traces the complexity of sibling relationships in a series of photographs featuring herself and her sister. Danger’s show opens at Artspace alongside Anna Hawkins’s single-channel video With Outthrust Arm, which cobbles together amateur Youtube footage of the canonical sculpture Laocoön and His Sons, on May 8 at 7 p.m.

Calgary

Carl White opens a new series of paintings in “A Tear in the Fabric,” which delves into portraiture and figurative work and opens at Jarvis Hall Fine Art on May 7 at 5 p.m. In “Night Elegy,” Madeleine Lamont explores ones of Canada’s most representative animals—the bear—with an opening and artist talk on May 9 beginning at 1 p.m. at Christine Klassen Gallery. At Newzones, colour comes into focus in Franco DeFrancesca’s solo show, while Cathy Daley opens a series of drawings on May 9 at 1 p.m. Herringer Kiss Gallery launches a new programming initiative on May 9 at 2 p.m.: the HK Incubator focuses on giving exposure to emerging artists, beginning with Nate McLeod, whose paintings often mimic the smooth appearance of Adobe Photoshop’s brush tool, blurring lines between the digital and the analog. The Untitled Art Society shows some neighbourly love with their upcoming show, “30 Years of Calgary Animation: A Celebration of the Quickdraw Animation Society,” which opens with a reception on May 8 at 7 p.m. Also hosted by the Untitled Art Society, Chelsea Rushton leads an artist talk and workshop on the circular mandala in embroidery at 2 p.m. on May 9.

Kelowna

“A Story of Canadian Art: As Told by the Hart House Art Collection” travels from its home in Toronto to the Kelowna Art Gallery, where the show, which features works by the likes of A.Y. Jackson, Arthur Lismer and J.E.H. MacDonald, opens on May 8 at 7 p.m.

Quebec City

At l’Œil de Poisson, Michael A. Robinson opens a large installation, Black Period, which claims to act as “an antidote to capitalism and commodity fetishism.” Also at l’Œil de Poisson, Camille Bernard-Gravel‘s new installation looks at the invisible wind phenomenon, while Jeff and Gordon‘s Art Rocks takes a more political, participatory approach. The three projects go view on May 8 at 8 p.m.

Hamilton

Brad Isaacs fleshes out the connections between hunting, colonialism and masculinity through the mediums of photography, collage and video in his exhibition “The Visible Universe, Including the Fires of Hell,” which opens at the McMaster Museum of Art on May 7.

Toronto

Fiona Ackerman’s paintings hover somewhere between painting and collage, and they open in “Night Driving” at p|m Gallery on May 7 at 6 p.m. Megan McCabe’s equally gestural painting opens on May 9 at 2 p.m. at LE Gallery. Chloe Wise’s “Pissing, Shmoozing and Looking Away” makes the trip from Montreal to open at Division Gallery on May 8 at 6 p.m. Alliance Française Toronto and the French Consulate in Toronto present a lecture on May 7 at 6:30 pm, on comics across cultures featuring Pénélope Bagieu, Boulet, Étienne Davodeau and Lorenzo Mattotti. Parents who get caught up photographing their children should take a leaf from Grit Schwerdtfeger’s new show, “Zehn,” which includes images of her son over a one-year period, and opens on May 7 at Corkin Gallery at 5 p.m. At Narwhal, work by Eunice Luk, Alicia Nauta and Luke Painter goes on view in “Roll up that tender air and the plant dies, the colour fades,” which kicks off with a reception on May 7 at 6 p.m. Art critic (and frequent contributor to this publication), R.M. Vaughan, launches a new book, Bright Eyed: Insomnia and Its Cultures, on May 13 at Videofag at 7 p.m.

Saskatoon

Wally Dion and Matthew Shlian’s “Rock, Paper, Scissors” opens at 330g on May 9 with a reception at 1 pm; the show runs through May 30, but one might want to make note of the artist-run space’s Saturdays-only hours.

Ottawa

The Carleton University Art Gallery hosts a day dedicated to performance art on May 9, with pieces by Lisa Myers, Christof Migone, MORTIFIED, Bridget Moser and Adam Saikaley taking place between 12 and 4 p.m. At Cube Gallery, Greg Ludlow, Don McVeigh and Peter Dolan open group exhibition on May 7 at 6 p.m.

Vancouver

Vancouver-based artist Kalli Niedoba opens a new sculpture at CSA Space in “A Mirage On A Hill” on May 7 at 6 p.m. Access Gallery hosts a mapping event at Hadden Park, meeting at the Hadden Park Field House on May 9 at 2:00 p.m., in conjunction with their current exhibition, “Field Studies: Exercises in a Living Landscape.” Artists Rebecca Bayer and Laura Kozak will be in attendance. At Macaulay & Co. Fine Art on May 9 at 1 p.m., Robert Arndt opens “Pursuit, Plunder and Fleece,” an exhibition that centres around a short film of the same title and an installation of photos and objects. London-based Aura Satz has a screening of films at DIM Cinema, beginning at 7:30 p.m. on May 13. Bau-Xi Gallery celebrates a major landmark—50 years of operation—with an anniversary exhibition on May 7 at 7 p.m.: comprised of two shows, the celebration features a group show on the main floor that looks at the gallery’s stable of artists, while an exhibition on the upper floor takes a look back at the gallery’s history. Takao Tanabe’s paintings are synonymous with coastal vistas—they are dreamy and expansive, and open at Equinox Gallery on May 9.

Burnaby

SFU Gallery holds a talk on May 9 at noon, bringing together artists Carole Itter and Devon Knowles to discuss their projects for the gallery’s exhibition “Geometry of Knowing: Part 3,” which runs through May 15.

Montreal

Nyloïd, a large, unwieldy sound sculpture made by the duo Cod.Act, with flailing nylon limbs that emits otherworldly sounds, goes on view at the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal on May 13; it’s bizarre and a little frightening, but definitely worth a visit. On May 8 at 5:30 pm, Toronto painter Scott Everingham will launch a new body of work at Patrick Mikhail. “IGNITION 11,” an exhibition showcasing work by seven graduate students in Concordia University’s Studio Art program, opens to the public at the Leonard and Bina Ellen Art Gallery on May 7.

Prince George

A locally relevant exhibition of David Thauberger’s paintings based on the architectural vernacular of Prince George opens at Two Rivers Gallery on May 7 at 7:30 pm, alongside an exhibition of Jeff Molloy’s mixed-media assemblages.

Kingston

The Agnes Etherington Art Centre will launch three new exhibitions of works by female artists on May 8 at 5:30 pm, in conjunction with the Canadian Women Artists History Initiative conference. “The Artist Herself,” which features self-portraits from the late 1700s to the 1960s by both European and Indigenous female artists working in Canada, will run alongside two contemporary shows, Deirdre Logue and Allyson Mitchell’s gender-probing “I’m Not Myself At All” and Margaret Lock’s “Vanitas.”

Edmonton

Audio and visual artist Gary James Joynes continues his experiments with sonic phenomena in his new exhibition “Broken Sound,” which opens at dc3 Art Projects on May 7 with a reception at 5 p.m. On May 9 at 2 p.m., Scott Gallery will hold an opening reception for an exhibition titled “The Silent Landscape,” which offers two different takes on the genre from painters Robert and Joel Sinclair.

Halifax

Hermes will hold a reception on May 8 at 6 p.m. for the opening of two new projects with complementary themes: Becky Welter-Nolan’s exhibition “Cabin Fever,” which considers social influence and self-doubt, and an installation from Stephanie Yee exploring identity and place.

Our weekly must-sees, published each Thursday, are chosen from opening and event announcements sent to preview@canadianart.ca at least two days prior to publication. For listings of art openings, exhibitions and events, visit canadianart.ca/exhibitions.

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Comments

Deborah Wilson says:

VICTORIA New works and self portraits by Kay Lovett on at the Martin Batchelor Gallery from May 9th – June4th. IMPERMANENCE contemplates life through the lens of a cancer survivor. The opening was a huge success so many people turned up, must to go back to see more of the art.

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